Brock & Co.

Frank Henry Shapleigh (1842 - 1906)
In St. George Street, St. Augustine, Florida, 1891
Oil on board
12 x 7 inches
Signed and dated at lower right: F. H. Shapleigh 1891.
Inscribed verso: In St. George Street / St. Augustine Florida / by / F. H. Shapleigh.
Period frame
ARTIST BIOGRAPHY
Frank H. Shapleigh was born in Boston and studied painting at the Lowell Institute of Drawing. In 1867-1868, he sailed to Europe where he studied in the studio of Emile Lambinet (1815-1877).

Shapleigh painted throughout New England, in St. Augustine, Florida, California, and in Europe. For sixteen years, from 1877 to 1893, he was artist-in-residence at the Crawford House in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. He wintered at the Ponce de Leon Hotel, St. Augustine, in 1886-1887, and he became the artist-in-residence at the hotel from 1889 until 1892. After a trip to Europe in 1896, he built a summer home and art studio in Jackson, New Hampshire, which he called "Maple Knoll."

Today Shapleigh is best known for his well-executed White Mountain landscapes which include all of the major tourist attractions and personal, intimate landscapes of New Hampshire. Shapleigh painted Mount Washington and the other well-known mountains from dozens of different locations.

Shapleigh exhibited at the Boston Athenaeum and the National Academy of Design among other venues. He was an active member of the Boston Art Club. His work can be found in the collection Farnsworth Art Museum, Maine; New Britain Museum of Art, Connecticut; Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College; Portland Museum of Art, Maine; University of New Hampshire; New Hampshire Historical Society and many more.

Who Was Who in American Art states: “One of the best known artists of New Hampshire’s White Mountains, he had a summer studio there throughout the last quarter of the 19th century, located in the Crawford House, an upscale hotel in Mount Washington Valley and attracted the tourists who were his clientele. Shapleigh also served in the Civil War from 1863 and then established a portrait studio in Boston. After studying in Paris, he shared a studio in Boston with John Appleton Brown. He generally indicated the place and date on each of his paintings.” He was a close friend of John J. Enneking and Benjamin Champney and often painted with them en plein aire on location. He is one of the most sought after and popular turn-of-the-century White Mountain painters.”